Anna McLaskey

Anna McLaskey

Graduate Student

Biological Oceanography

I am a biological oceanographer and zooplankton ecologist interested in how environmental changes influence zooplankton populations and their role in marine ecosystems. My research focuses on the influence of ocean acidification on crustacean zooplankton, primarily copepods and krill.  

I use a combination of field and laboratory techniques to investigate how sensitivity and exposure vary across life stages, the indirect effects of OA on zooplankton driven by changes in the quality of their prey, and the complex interactions of pH with temperature and oxygen in the field.

Puget Sound and the West Coast of North America are fascinating areas to study ocean acidification because natural oceanographic processes lead to lower and more variable pH conditions, providing a “natural laboratory” to investigate conditions that will become more widespread in the future.

I am also an IGERT Fellow in the UW Program on Ocean Change and am interested in ocean systems from an interdisciplinary, human-ecological perspective. Through this program I am a part of an interdisciplinary student research team investigating the role that expert knowledge plays in sea level rise adaptation planning in US coastal cities. http://depts.washington.edu/igertpoc/ 

Anna McLaskey

Anna McLaskey

Graduate Student

Biological Oceanography

I am a biological oceanographer and zooplankton ecologist interested in how environmental changes influence zooplankton populations and their role in marine ecosystems. My research focuses on the influence of ocean acidification on crustacean zooplankton, primarily copepods and krill.  

I use a combination of field and laboratory techniques to investigate how sensitivity and exposure vary across life stages, the indirect effects of OA on zooplankton driven by changes in the quality of their prey, and the complex interactions of pH with temperature and oxygen in the field.

Puget Sound and the West Coast of North America are fascinating areas to study ocean acidification because natural oceanographic processes lead to lower and more variable pH conditions, providing a “natural laboratory” to investigate conditions that will become more widespread in the future.

I am also an IGERT Fellow in the UW Program on Ocean Change and am interested in ocean systems from an interdisciplinary, human-ecological perspective. Through this program I am a part of an interdisciplinary student research team investigating the role that expert knowledge plays in sea level rise adaptation planning in US coastal cities. http://depts.washington.edu/igertpoc/