Angie Boysen

Angie Boysen

Graduate Student

Chemical Oceanography

I'm a graduate student working in the lab of Anitra Ingalls in the UW School of Oceanography. My research focuses on understanding the important roles that microbes play in controlling the ocean biogeochemical cycles. I approach this topic by making measurements of small organic molecules that microbes use and produce. I think of these molecules as the currency of microbes - they can't talk to us or to one another, but we can trace their activity and interactions through the chemical exchanges they make and the signatures they leave behind. My research so far has focused on studying microbial communities in the Pacific Ocean, primarily in the surface of the subtropical gyre near Hawaii.

Before starting graduate school I worked in environmental education for two years and I continue to be passionate about science education and outreach. As part of the UW IGERT Program on Ocean Change I worked with three other UW graduate students to develop a middle school curriculum about biological, chemical, and physical processes in the ocean through the lense of understanding fish kills in Puget Sound. I am a 2017 Pacific Science Center Science Communications Fellow and also volunteer with the Sierra Club's Inspiring Connections Outdoors group that works with public schools in Seattle to provide opportunities for youth to explore the natural world.

Angie Boysen

Angie Boysen

Graduate Student

Chemical Oceanography

I'm a graduate student working in the lab of Anitra Ingalls in the UW School of Oceanography. My research focuses on understanding the important roles that microbes play in controlling the ocean biogeochemical cycles. I approach this topic by making measurements of small organic molecules that microbes use and produce. I think of these molecules as the currency of microbes - they can't talk to us or to one another, but we can trace their activity and interactions through the chemical exchanges they make and the signatures they leave behind. My research so far has focused on studying microbial communities in the Pacific Ocean, primarily in the surface of the subtropical gyre near Hawaii.

Before starting graduate school I worked in environmental education for two years and I continue to be passionate about science education and outreach. As part of the UW IGERT Program on Ocean Change I worked with three other UW graduate students to develop a middle school curriculum about biological, chemical, and physical processes in the ocean through the lense of understanding fish kills in Puget Sound. I am a 2017 Pacific Science Center Science Communications Fellow and also volunteer with the Sierra Club's Inspiring Connections Outdoors group that works with public schools in Seattle to provide opportunities for youth to explore the natural world.