Angie Boysen

Angie Boysen

Graduate Student

Chemical Oceanography

she/her/hers

I'm a graduate student working in the lab of Anitra Ingalls in the UW School of Oceanography. My research focuses on understanding the important roles that microbes play in controlling the ocean biogeochemical cycles. I approach this topic by making measurements of small organic molecules that microbes use and produce. I think of these molecules as the currency of microbes - they can't talk to us or to one another, but we can trace their activity and interactions through the chemical exchanges they make and the signatures they leave behind. My research so far has focused on studying microbial communities in the Pacific Ocean, primarily in the surface of the subtropical gyre near Hawaii and in the North Pacific Transition Zone between the subtropical and subarctic gyres.

 

Science needs to be accessible and welcoming to everyone who wants to participate. Despite this, there are huge systemic and cultural barriers that currently limit the ability of some people to participate in science. I am committed to working towards removing these barriers in order to broaden the participation of underrepresented groups in sciences and create welcoming learning and working environments for all people. As someone who comes from a place of great privilege, I continue to work to educate myself on what barriers exist for people of other backgrounds and what the best-practices are for removing those barriers.  As part of these efforts, I implement equitable teaching strategies in my own classes, and as a member of the School of Oceanography, I work within the department to try to implement structural changes to improve our department's graduate student recruitment, admissions, support, and assessment. 

Before starting graduate school I worked in environmental education for two years and I continue to be passionate about science education and outreach. As part of the UW IGERT Program on Ocean Change I worked with three other UW graduate students to develop a middle school curriculum about biological, chemical, and physical processes in the ocean through the lens of understanding fish kills in Puget Sound. I was a 2017 Pacific Science Center Science Communications Fellow and I also volunteer with the Sierra Club's Inspiring Connections Outdoors group that works with public schools in Seattle to provide opportunities for youth to explore the natural world. 

Angie Boysen

Angie Boysen

Graduate Student

Chemical Oceanography

she/her/hers

I'm a graduate student working in the lab of Anitra Ingalls in the UW School of Oceanography. My research focuses on understanding the important roles that microbes play in controlling the ocean biogeochemical cycles. I approach this topic by making measurements of small organic molecules that microbes use and produce. I think of these molecules as the currency of microbes - they can't talk to us or to one another, but we can trace their activity and interactions through the chemical exchanges they make and the signatures they leave behind. My research so far has focused on studying microbial communities in the Pacific Ocean, primarily in the surface of the subtropical gyre near Hawaii and in the North Pacific Transition Zone between the subtropical and subarctic gyres.

 

Science needs to be accessible and welcoming to everyone who wants to participate. Despite this, there are huge systemic and cultural barriers that currently limit the ability of some people to participate in science. I am committed to working towards removing these barriers in order to broaden the participation of underrepresented groups in sciences and create welcoming learning and working environments for all people. As someone who comes from a place of great privilege, I continue to work to educate myself on what barriers exist for people of other backgrounds and what the best-practices are for removing those barriers.  As part of these efforts, I implement equitable teaching strategies in my own classes, and as a member of the School of Oceanography, I work within the department to try to implement structural changes to improve our department's graduate student recruitment, admissions, support, and assessment. 

Before starting graduate school I worked in environmental education for two years and I continue to be passionate about science education and outreach. As part of the UW IGERT Program on Ocean Change I worked with three other UW graduate students to develop a middle school curriculum about biological, chemical, and physical processes in the ocean through the lens of understanding fish kills in Puget Sound. I was a 2017 Pacific Science Center Science Communications Fellow and I also volunteer with the Sierra Club's Inspiring Connections Outdoors group that works with public schools in Seattle to provide opportunities for youth to explore the natural world.