Erik Fredrickson

Erik Fredrickson

Graduate Student

MG&G

he/him/his

I started the graduate program in 2016 and, as of March 2020, I'm now officially a PhD Candidate. I got my B.S. in Physics and Geology here at the UW back in 2012, took a hiatus to brew chai tea professionally and decide what I wanted to do, then worked on a small research project for William Wilcock that convinced me to pursue a doctorate in marine geophysics. I can honestly say that I didn’t know precisely what I wanted to study when I started up, but I loved the nature of the work -- using math and physics to solve tangible problems with real-world applications, gaining coding skills along the way. Since then, I’ve really become interested in the world of seafloor geodetics, studying how the solid earth deforms in settings like subduction zones and undersea volcanoes. This interest goes hand-in-hand with exploration of new technologies and techniques necessary for obtaining high-resolution measurements in the presence of ocean noise, which I’ve also greatly enjoyed. My current research projects include 1) reducing oceanographic noise on seafloor pressure gauges (in part by using physical circulation models) to be able to detect subtle deformation caused by slow slip earthquakes, and 2) assessing the performance of a novel seafloor tilt meter on Axial Seamount and using the data, in conjunction with that of other tilt instruments in the area, to study the detailed inflation behavior of the volcano.

Our department has a really strong grad student community and there are so many opportunities to get involved in social activities, whether you’re new to the area or an old hand looking for something new to do. Since joining the department, I’ve played on intramural sports teams, joined the book club, helped publish a bi-monthly-ish zine (The Touch Tank), and really upped my cycling game. I am also one of the core organizers of ARGO (the graduate student club) and the Graduate/Post-Doc Symposium. At home I’m also obsessed with all things fermentation, and a craft enthusiast -- not an expert in anything, but can hold my own with a sewing machine, embroidery hoop, or printing screen.

I acknowledge that I live and work in the ancestral land and water of the Coast Salish people.

Erik Fredrickson

Erik Fredrickson

Graduate Student

MG&G

he/him/his

I started the graduate program in 2016 and, as of March 2020, I'm now officially a PhD Candidate. I got my B.S. in Physics and Geology here at the UW back in 2012, took a hiatus to brew chai tea professionally and decide what I wanted to do, then worked on a small research project for William Wilcock that convinced me to pursue a doctorate in marine geophysics. I can honestly say that I didn’t know precisely what I wanted to study when I started up, but I loved the nature of the work -- using math and physics to solve tangible problems with real-world applications, gaining coding skills along the way. Since then, I’ve really become interested in the world of seafloor geodetics, studying how the solid earth deforms in settings like subduction zones and undersea volcanoes. This interest goes hand-in-hand with exploration of new technologies and techniques necessary for obtaining high-resolution measurements in the presence of ocean noise, which I’ve also greatly enjoyed. My current research projects include 1) reducing oceanographic noise on seafloor pressure gauges (in part by using physical circulation models) to be able to detect subtle deformation caused by slow slip earthquakes, and 2) assessing the performance of a novel seafloor tilt meter on Axial Seamount and using the data, in conjunction with that of other tilt instruments in the area, to study the detailed inflation behavior of the volcano.

Our department has a really strong grad student community and there are so many opportunities to get involved in social activities, whether you’re new to the area or an old hand looking for something new to do. Since joining the department, I’ve played on intramural sports teams, joined the book club, helped publish a bi-monthly-ish zine (The Touch Tank), and really upped my cycling game. I am also one of the core organizers of ARGO (the graduate student club) and the Graduate/Post-Doc Symposium. At home I’m also obsessed with all things fermentation, and a craft enthusiast -- not an expert in anything, but can hold my own with a sewing machine, embroidery hoop, or printing screen.

I acknowledge that I live and work in the ancestral land and water of the Coast Salish people.