Mark Warner

Mark Warner

Associate Professor WOT

Chemical Oceanography

I am interested in the application of dissolved anthropogenic tracers to the study of ocean ventilation and mixing processes. I have been involved in WOCE, the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, and the repeat occupations of a subset of these sections under various programs (currently GO-SHIP) in the Pacific, Indian, Atlantic, and Southern Oceans. I have also participated in studies of the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan aboard a Russian research vessel, and of deep water formation areas along the Adelie Coast of Antarctica with Australian colleagues.

The current version of the tracer analytical system can quantitatively measure the dissolved concentrations of the two widely-used chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11 and CFC-12), sulfur hexafluoride, carbon tetrachloride, and nitrous oxide from a 200-cc seawater sample.

Mark Warner

Mark Warner

Associate Professor WOT

Chemical Oceanography

I am interested in the application of dissolved anthropogenic tracers to the study of ocean ventilation and mixing processes. I have been involved in WOCE, the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, and the repeat occupations of a subset of these sections under various programs (currently GO-SHIP) in the Pacific, Indian, Atlantic, and Southern Oceans. I have also participated in studies of the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan aboard a Russian research vessel, and of deep water formation areas along the Adelie Coast of Antarctica with Australian colleagues.

The current version of the tracer analytical system can quantitatively measure the dissolved concentrations of the two widely-used chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11 and CFC-12), sulfur hexafluoride, carbon tetrachloride, and nitrous oxide from a 200-cc seawater sample.